On Thursday 1 March, ACT Chapter Chair David Tassicker met with Brendan Smyth MLA, Deputy Leader of the
Opposition, Shadow Minister for Emergency Services and Bridgette Morten, Senior Adviser to Jeremy Hanson MLA,
Shadow Minister for Health of the ACT Legislative Assembly.

Discussions were fruitful and considered the evolution of the Paramedic profession in the journey to registration.
This included the great increase in the number of private providers seeking to employ Paramedics across Australia
and New Zealand in the past ten years and the burgeoning growth of an export healthcare industry employing
paramedic practitioners.

Paramedics Australasia’s policy positions on EMS delivery and paramedic registration were outlined and an emphasis
was placed on the benefits of practitioner registration that will help protect the public by providing:

  • a consistent national standard of education, qualifications and experience
  • protection of the title of Paramedic so only registered Paramedics will be able to use that title
  • a transparent review and complaints mechanism to evaluate fitness-to-practice
  • an objective regulatory and disciplinary process
  • measures to ensure Paramedics maintain contemporary standards of competency through ongoing education, and
  • greater flexibility and mobility of Paramedics to enhance sustainability and workforce arrangements.

It was also noted there is no National standard of quality, performance, review and audit of EMS (aka Ambulance) Services.
In contrast, organisations such as hospitals operate under the auspices of the Australian Council of Healthcare Standards.

Mr Smyth expressed positive sentiments regarding registration and asked to be kept appraised of developments.

On Thursday 1 March, ACT Chapter Chair David Tassicker met with Brendan Smyth MLA, Deputy Leader of the
Opposition, Shadow Minister for Emergency Services and Bridgette Morten, Senior Adviser to Jeremy Hanson MLA,
Shadow Minister for Health of the ACT Legislative Assembly.

Discussions were fruitful and discussed the evolution of the Paramedic profession in the journey to registration.
This included the great increase in the number of private providers seeking to employ Paramedics across Australia
and New Zealand in the past ten years and the burgeoning growth of an export healthcare industry employing
paramedic practitioners.

Paramedics Australasia’s policy positions on EMS delivery and paramedic registration were outlined and emphasis
was placed on the benefits of practitioner registration that will help protect the public by providing:
· a consistent national standard of education, qualifications and experience
· protection of the title of Paramedic so only registered Paramedics will be able to use that title
· a transparent review and complaints mechanism to evaluate fitness-to-practice
· an objective regulatory and disciplinary process
· measures to ensure Paramedics maintain contemporary standards of competency through ongoing education, and
· greater flexibility and mobility of Paramedics to enhance sustainability and workforce arrangements.

It was also noted there is no National standard of quality, performance, review and audit of EMS (aka Ambulance) Services.
In contrast, organisations such as hospitals operate under the auspices of the Australian Council of Healthcare Standards.
Mr Smyth expressed positive sentiments regarding registration and asked to be kept appraised of developments.